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Rankings and Admission Criteria

Rank   Business School Applicants
Accepted
Average
GMAT
Average Years
of Work Exp.
Average
Age
1 U. of Pennsylvania (Wharton) 14% 700 6 29
2 Northwestern (Kellogg) 18% 690 4 27
3 Stanford 8% 727 4 27
4 Harvard 13% 701 4 27
5 Columbia 12% 704 4 27
6 Duke (Fuqua) 19% 690 5 28
7 MIT (Sloan) 17% 703 5 28
8 Chicago (Booth) 25% 684 5 28
9 Cornell (Johnson) 25% 673 5 29
10 Dartmouth (Tuck) 14% 692 5 28
11 Michigan (Ross) 21% 677 5 29
12 NYU (Stern) 22% 686 5 27
13 UC — Berkeley (Haas) 14% 684 6 28
14 Virginia (Darden) 19% 676 4 27
15 Yale 17% 687 5 28
16 UCLA (Anderson) 15% 698 4 28
17 Carnegie Mellon (Tepper) 31% 660 5 28
18 UNC — Chapel Hill 22% 667 5 27
19 Texas — Austin (McCombs) 25% 687 5 29
20 Indiana (Kelley) 32% 646 5 28
21 USC (Marshall) 27% 670 5 28
22 Purdue (Krannert) 23% 644 5 28
23 Rochester (Simon) 30% 646 6 29
24 Georgetown (McDonough) 19% 657 5 28
25 Washington U. (Olin) 29% 661 5 28
Applicants Accepted
Certain business schools such as University of Chicago and Carnegie Mellon have rather self-selecting applicant pools and, therefore, it is not necessarily accurate to judge these particular MBA programs as being “easier to get into.”
Average GMAT Score 

This admissions criteria does serve as a fairly good indicator of a business school’s selectivity. When the average score is below 650, such as it is with Indiana (Kelley), Rochester (Simon), and Purdue (Krannert), you can safely assume that these schools are much more likely to extend you an admission offer.

However, don’t assume that a good GMAT score will get you in or even give you a significant advantage. The test just isn’t given that much weight. More than half of enrolled students scored between a 700 and 740 on the GMAT; about 25% scored between 650 and 690.

Average Years of Work Experience and Average Age
These criteria are nearly uniform across all the top business schools. The difference between the successful applicant at Stanford or Harvard and the applicant who is only successful at the bottom five of these MBA schools is that the “stereotypical” student at Stanford or Harvard has a remarkable resume with many accomplishments and rapid promotions. On the other hand, a typical student at USC (Marshall) or Vanderbilt (Owen) has achieved one or maybe two promotions in his or her four or five years of work experience and had nothing exciting or dramatic to report in the application essays.